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disagree on this issue. i think we start taxing these people. they are already benefiting from the social serve thes and encase system. so let's tax them. from a security point of view, this is helpful and i think that this is not an amnesty. you are letting people go of a crime. these people are going to have are to pay taxes and crimes. i cthink it is a brilliant program. the only thing stopping it is president obama if he does not agree to it. >> if this does not have border security in it. the republican party, to me, if you give the free flow of immigration for workers, there can still be border security, there could be -- right? anybody who wants to come for legitimate reason ares wants to come. >> right. >> larry, can i ask a question? >> what i want to say, all right i'll direct it tow. the gop should be the party of growth and opportunity and the party of entrepreneurship and the party of upward mobilitity. here is my point. if the brainyacs come in because we want them to stay and want to attract them and if the rest of the workforce lets go of the skills, they may climb the lad
, in addition to the payroll tax increased, we want to be cautious around u.s. large-cap stock. we see what happens when interest rates go up. there will be a limit to how high rates will get but will trudge higher here on the ten-year. be careful there. >> a good point in terms of the emerging markets. how do you want to play that and participate in this, etfs or what? >> we try to find managers that try to find a little bit of alpha on that within the various markets. you could do etf iffy want to get in and try to find a manager. there's been able to the last five of the years. >> one of the things about imerging markets that peel don't understand, the ones that are growing the fastest also pay the highest difficult dense. i think can you pla i it with etfs and to it with lower volume etfs. ent rim into that space can be easier and cheaper as well. >> low volatility and better performance, so it's almost a holy grail type of approach. >> and there are a handful of etfs that do just that. >> rick santelli, the jury is still out on whether or not it's official, whether we're actually seein
, larry, and you can't tax an economy in the prosperity period. >> look, ideally you would say okay, we're going to freeze government spending at this level and that would mean over time it is going to fall as a percentage of the economy, but you can't ever get congress to do that, right? so it always ends up being something very harsh to get things done. and so this is the consequence that you have to face. at least in the short term. that you're going to have a short-term hit to gdp. but in the long run, the numbers are going to be better for the united states. >> most of that stuff is transfer payments. >> agreed. >> it will not even affect gdp. defense purchases do affect gdp. but to america since nobody ever wants to cut spending -- >> you got to cut somewhere. >> and i would do it right now. >> and it will only happen during bad times, larry. it will never happen during good times. we see that over and over again, when the economy is going gang busters, the government just chooses to spend more. it's in its nature. you have to do it when it's tough. >> lower spending means a stron
. the consumer is in a worse spot primarily because of tax hikes. supply side economics, right. so apple is a consumer company for the most part and i think that any consumer company will struggle. >> that's an important point. let's follow that point. is part of this apple drop weakness in consumer spending or expected weakness, or is it, in fact, the competition from samsung and the fact that the company is not executing. in other words is it a company story, an economics story, what is it? >> there's a lot of company specific stuff going on just comparables this quarter versus a year ago. that's part of it. it's a maturing company to a degree. it's going through its growth phase. now getting into the phase which hopefully will last a long time you focus on return on invested capital. that could be fine. the market has to adjust to that perception. i think the consumer point is a good one. is the consumer going retrench with higher taxes and we see the jobless claims out the last few weeks -- >> coming down. >> they are looking great. >> is it seasonal or real. we won't know that for a
the payroll tax cut will cut into consumer discretionary spending down the line. apples ipads and iphones sold a lot but the profit margin was slim. is this a company story where the company is in trouble after the great steve jobs has passed snarp. >> it feels that way, larry. we've got this darling-to-dog story we've seen so often notice tech space. we have a gadget company in the tech space that's struggling with margins on its gadgets and a lot of the worst fears that they would face other gadgets from other kinds of companies seem to be coming to pass, but the service tech companies like google and netflix, they're all of a sudden out there increasing share. >> knock the cover off the ball. >> knock the cover on. and as long as you have a razor blade story and not a razor story, i think that's the difference peer. >> dave goldman, am i wrong? sometimes ji am very wrong. does this forecast a stronger american economy, even a moderately stronger economy? >> absolutely not. i was a raging bull in 2012. i'm neutral on it. the s&p is trading tick for tick with liquidity measures, such as infla
majority leader eric cantor is there and says the to leaders tax eswill not sigo up. you're watching cnbc, first in business worldwide. >>> we have had a busy, a barrage of earnings. we've had microsoft and at&t and starbucks, all posting their latest quarterly results minutes ago right here on the show. let's get a roundup now that we've had time to digest and read through all the earnings action. rights, bertha? give it to us. >> reporter: not full digestion but a tummy still full looking at the numbers. fiscal second quarter for microsoft beats by a penny. street looking for 75 cents. refnous more or less in line. actually had missed on both the top and bottom line last quarter. take a look at the reaction of the stock. we've got microsoft here. there we go. it's still down, however. sold 60 million windows 8 loy senses. no details on the surface sales. that's something else people may ask on the license call. at&t, strong on the bottom line, and actually missed on both the earnings for the same quarter last year. they said they saw smartphone fans, activated 18.6 iphones and 26% were
for the fiscal tax cliff and the spending sequester which i think is hilarious. they invented the sequester. we have had tax, spend and regulate policies for four years. why not try something different. let's talk about it with our powerhouse panel. jared bernstein, center on budget and policy priorities. senior fellow. doug holtz-ekin, peter suderman and james freeman, assistant editor for the wall street journal. james, i'm amoused right off the top. team obama starts attacking republicans first of all for the budget cutting sequester which they invented. second of all, for the fiscal cliff which they also invented. how silly is this? there is nothing serious about it at all. >> here we are. this is three years of big spending obamanomics. it's a terrible recovery. not what we need to create jobs. >> worst recovery since 1947. spending, taxing, regulating. we'll get into details. this report is not as bad as it's made out to be. >> i agree. >> the basic thrust is why not try something different? 2% growth is lousy, the worst since 1947 h. why not try something different? why not favor the pri
. did raising taxes work for california? we know it didn't work for phil mickelson. >> we hope he doesn't move away because we need him in his state of the state speech, governor quotes genesis seven years of fat followed by seven years of lean. he says the fat is back. and up next, what he plans to do about it. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. now this...will work. [ male announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 when the spx crossed
're worried about tax reform. jobs and unemployment. this is catapulted to the front of the line. why now do you think? >> well, big items like this. and this is a big one. need to be done early in a session. even with an issue like this that favors republicans, people get skittish so, i think, if you're going to move something this big, you've got to start early. >> can i -- can i barely call this? as i really want to because i think you're in the right direction. can i say that if done properly and orderly way, this is pro-growth, this is pro-growth, those immigrants come here to work and they'll help us. could it be sold as a pro-growth measure? >> you bet, you bet it can. just on the regular immigration reform that people think about. that's pro-growth, but what you mentioned, few people realize is part of this. on the high-tech side, we have american companies that are having a whale of a time finding enough americans to fill positions in the so-called stem fields. and this would deal with that issue and it would allow individuals who are educated in our universities receiving masters a
, and it's about see some very soft consumption numbers. have you a $200 billion tax increase this year and a $110 billion sequester. these are not small fiscal tight things. it means that first and second quarter are going to be very weak. it's no longer going to be talking about the risks of the fiscal cliff. we're actually getting about half of the fiscal cliff, so i think you're supposed to be cautious for the next few months. >> and that's not necessarily what we're seeing in investor behavior right now, margie. the same question for you. is this justified given the fact that we are headed into the next couple of months where things will get tougher? we know that we're garnishing defense cuts coming. we know that the fourth quarter was weak because everybody was in lockdown moved. do you want to lighten up on stocks, or not? >> may have a few little bumps in the road. frankically i welcome government spending cuts. i think that would be very positive long term. when you look at way from the government and look at what companies are doing, company results. global competitiveness, ha
what would happen with their taxes. the uncertainty was horrendous, the mood sour. . we were getting all sorts of cross currents about what would happen with corporate and personal taxes. were they going to raise taxes, were capital gains going up? would the alternative minimum tax snare millions of people? would businesses have to start a whole brand new round of layoffs? executive after executive came on this show to say, look, we can't do a thing. what's the point? we will just have to undo it. business confidence plummeted, and the idea of forming a new business. well, remember when the ceo of paychex came on and talked about the paralysis caused by the cliff? who would leave his job to start a new business in that environment? okay. retail sales weren't that bad. but they nose dived right at the end of the quarter. retailers were afraid to restock inventory figuring that spending would drop off the cliff right along with the nation's finances. it was all in all a very bad time for our nation. now, overlay the storm of the century for the northeast. one that shut down the wealthi
and real estate taxes are combined in one monthly figure. and what the number? including made service twice a day. and all of the other amenities which come with this, which include a spa. >> maybe up into the 50s. >> a little under $60,000 a month. >> that actually very reasonable. >> yeah, very reasonable. with maintenance fees, that around $720,000 a year. include care takers, your insurance, cleaning staff and more. and it probably cost around $1 million a year, just to keep the lights on in this apartment, in the historic sherry ledgerland building. maintenance fees are popping up all over high end in new york city. if you bought a 1200 square foot condo, that will cost you around $2,000 a month in maintenance fees. on top of mortgage and utility. what do you get for that $60 grand at sherry netherland. made service, restaurant downstairs, should be all you can eat for that amount. el rater operators. and three private elevators. to see more of the $95 million mega mansion and go one on one with dolly lands, and secret lives of the super rich meg why home. it is a great show. >> i know
do we mean just raising taxes? isn't most of the austerity in europe raising taxes? >> no. >> not in greece? >> it would actually be starting to collect taxes. >> we raise taxes, which have to do with the middle class -- >> that's the austerity you're talking about, raising taxes? >> yes. >> and also the cutting of wages. we have a dramatic cut in wages, not only in the public sector, but also in the private sector. because the economy, the basis itself on small and medium enterprises, which mainly produce for the domestic market, this has been a distraction. we have lost a lot of jobs, a lot of company, the private sector in a very bad state, in a country which was growing with a rate of more than 4%. but this double -- >> so much more than you were taking in at that point. there's a deficit that has to be paid off. and the measures you're talking about, technology and organizing the economy could take a long time to kick in. >> this is correct. but the main problem in greece was always state revenues. because they do not tax the rates. they allow tax evasion for the weal
about tamiflu. prescription for flu. ...tax time can ofbe...well...taxing. so right now we'll give you... ...$10 off any turbo tax deluxe level software or higher! find thousands of big deals now... ...at officemax. >>> i'm jim cramer. welcome to my world. >> you need to get in the game. >> firms are going to go out of business, and he's nuts. they're nuts. they know nothing. >> i always like to say there's a bull market somewhere. >> "mad money," you can't afford to miss it. >>> hey, i'm cramer. welcome to "mad money." welcome to cramerica. some people want to make friends. i'm just trying to help you make a little money. my job isn't just to entertain but to educate and teach. call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. the dow jones average is just a stone's throw from 14,000. headed to its all time high that we reached five years ago. the index which rallied 72 points along with s&p and nasdaq 52.2% is in rarified territory for certain. yet the chatter it remains skeptical. as i've said many a time, i'm never going to criticize the skepticism. i applaud it. it is a quality that has made me a ton of
see anything different. a lot of revenue and cash was earned due to taxes coming up. so people front loaded earnings, cash money, liquidity that were currently enjoying. but i'm not quite sure we didn't steal from this year and as the year wears on whether that's going to be an issue not going forward. >> you're saying there were so many expectations that we took them from the future and perhaps things slow down later on in 2013? >> i do believe that's a risk factor. and i think also it will depend on what comes out of washington with respect to structure reform in a number of areas too. you know, at the end of the day, we just don't see the base revenue growth on a really exciting basis going forward. we have hints of it, but we're not there yet. companies aren't truly spending. they're still sitting on cash. they paid a lot of dividends last year. they're not hiring people right now. and there's a lot of wait and see. what's the environment going to look like before businesses really get aggressive in business development. i think that could weigh in going forward. the other would
've raised taxes by $200 billion a year. the reason that u.s. stocks are up 5% after this horrible thing we've done to our selves that under norm circumstances would cause a recession is because we're in a global economy and every other major country in the world is doing the right thing while we're doing the wrong thing. that's propping us up. we're fine, we'll have a great year. these other countries doing things right, that aren't kicking the can down the road, they're going to have fabulous years. that's where you want to put your money, my friend. >> i was reporting in 2007 when we hit dow 14,000 and everyone got slammed on that. there's a hesitance at these levels. what's not getting talked about enough is the impact on consumer sentiment. if you go to any coffee shop, grocery store, anywhere in this country, people are looking at their 401(k), they feel better and i think that will translate into positive consumer spending, which filters into the whole economy. >> the retail investors is getting involved. the money flows are ramping up tremendously on the retail side. i would disagre
shape. >> taxes maybe. >> taxes are an issue, but. >> yesterday, i was told walmart are trying to deal with this now. people are coming in to try to buy things and people are getting pennies out of their pocket. >> walmart, they were able to see that people would be coming into the shore as their paychecks came in. they were coming in really late at night on a monday or whatever the cycle was. >> my brother is in food sales. he says at the end of the month, and you don't even have to go in and is visit some of the merchants. people don't have money and they're not really buying anything. there's a real cycle. >> did you hear it being used at the end of the month? i like that better than at the end of the day. >> that's underused. i hear people say at the end of the day. sometimes we ask them a question and they say it five times in the answer. every time they say it, they go, it was good that i saved it. at the end of the year, what will the toelgdz to 13 have been? >> i think around 2%. i don't think it's accelerating. i'm concerned about the impact of global growth, i'm concerned abo
the money that you need toward all of this. and i'd like to get your take on the tax structure that is most favorable to getting people to be as generous as they can. what could you tell our viewers in terms of what government policy may be able to do to actually encourage more giving and how it can hurt? >> well, the tax deductibility of charitable giving certainly has been a positive factor in why the u.s. is the most generous. people give about 2% of their incomes and that's true it's not disproportionately the richest. across the board americans are quite generous. the estate tax which lets your charitable giving not be taxed is clearly a very positive encouragement to look at giving. i'd say that even more than the taxes, though, the fact that there's more examples of people where -- so everyone is asking themselves, you know, could i be giving you something, the fact that they hear the impact is very strong, i think the kind of social movement is even more, but the tax structure helps. >> what continuing investment is needed at this point? in other words who are the biggest stakeholde
of potentially getting out of the eurozone. today, he took a different tactic. we talked about not raising tax rates, but as corporations around the world both affecting issues in the uk and elsewhere are becoming a real issue. i want you to take a look at this piece. >> individuals and bess must pay their fair var. and businesses who think they can carry on, they can keep selling to the uk, and selling uk tax arrangements are for you to wake up and sell the company. >> that comment, by the way, about coffee is actually about starbucks which has created some problems because they've been avoiding taxes in the uk. but take a look at this quote right here. david cameron not making friends. labor mp dennis skinner says it was gruesome for the prime minister to be heading out of austerity-riddled britain to wine and dine at davos with 50 top bankser who helped create the economic crash several hundred tax avoiding milliona e millionaires. >> a lot of people talk today about a report. there was a report earlier this morning that mr. oh lund discovered averting. in total, the report was said to be
. >> what do you make of the tax issue which is starting to hit -- this is one of becky's big issues. she's been writing about about this -- how many years? >> the tax issue? >> the tax issue. >> the tax issue -- >> the -- the sales -- online sales tax. >> california and texas were hit this quarter. it could have played a role and probably did because u.s. revenues were lighter than international. i think for the most part there's a tradeoff. i think as they don't have to worry about violating the statute which is the no presence. and when they go down the path of actually charging sales taxes, that does mean they can actually move closer to the consumers, build some of the fulfillment centers there and offer some of the amazon conveniences. >> and i think amazon is actually behind some sort of a compromise that would bring you revenue on a per state basis at least. >> right. it is going to affect the bottom line ultimately. >> it -- i think so. i think that there's a lot of areas in investment i think for amazon below the gross profit line. i think we focus a lot, investors focus a lot o
, competition from bonds, not so great. i still can't get over that they preserve thafd dividend low tax rate these are bond equivalents, a lot of stocks, especially when they boost the dividends. keep the balls in the air. that's what can happen. >> yeah. a lot of discussion yesterday as to why the fomc continues nobody that kind of mode as opposed to something else, which people speculated a lot b meantime, speaking of broad economy and markets, a pair of multinationals falling in the premarket, ups posting a earns of $1.32 that missed. revenues slightly exceeded. also issues guidance below estimates and dow chemical says the company saw significant deterioration in market it is serves, especially china. earlier on "squawk," dow chemical outlined the challenges for the company. >> could dampen the economy again through our politics but i would tell you i key is good things out of china with their leadership stabilizing and emerging asia as a whole. 35% of dow's revenues are now in emerging geographies and where we are putting a lot of our investment and our money. >> how concerning, jim, tw
-- there are promises in election campaigns that some taxes might be lightened a little bit. but on the whole, italy has no skill for a fiscal expansion. so at the moment, they're going to have to button down, keep spending heightened and keep things right. >> do you think italy is in a better position? >> in the short-term, spain has a more stable government. that's becoming unpopular, but at the moment, there's no threat to the majority of the popular party in spain. >> italy, we have an election coming up and anything could happen. we have a lot of strange things going on. there is a party which is looking like it will get around 15 cents a vote run by a former comedian. there's no clear political agenda, as well. there is a lot of political instability, but i think the long-term economic picture is in less trouble because it has much lower overall debt limits than spain combined. >> and how times have changed on that front. thanks very much for your time this morning. >> thank you. >>> growing market optimism fueled by a string of upbeat earnings has put equity markets on stronger footing. but u.s.
a property tax program for the city as early as the first half of this year. in hong kong, the hang seng lost .4%. the noble shares split 5.25% despite a record quarter in top and bottom line. that stock had gained 50% since last august to a multi year high. we are seeing some profit taking here. the kospi pulled back a modest 0.1% after gaining for two days. australia's asx 200 snapped a ten-day winning streak with miners losing. india's sensex now trading lower by 0.6%. back to you. >> sixuan, thanks for that. >>> now a couple of web stories popping online, the dow joins industrial average yesterday, just 46 points from topping that trading high. can it take out that 14,000 mark? find out what analysts have to say at cnbc.com. >>> after topping analyst estimates from the quarter, google is now priced at more than $750 a share. but if ths that stock going to from hot to too hot? find out on the website, as well. >>> despite the initial disappointment, some analysts are arguinging the release of the new blackberry will be positive. >>> still to come, the dreamliner, nippon airways has grounde
and wondered whether there was selling for tax reasons and things of that nature and the people i have spoken to this morning, who do manage money, say the same. all right. let's watch it today. let it weed out and then perhaps revisit it in a few days. >> a couple of dividend. you talked about how that could help, maybe they actually go in and do a buy back of monstrous proportions. >> that could be around the corner. their next meeting, board meeting, is february, when they initiated the dividend f that's catalyst that's a catalyst. isn't it sad to think this was once the go go growth company and now looking the a possible dividend or buy back as the next catalyst for the shares? my how things have changed. >> that requires a management that thinks there's something wrong with the stock. requires a management to hit the stock, maybe they are, maybe they are not. >> buy back or a dividend, acknowledgments? >> so clear the stock was blowing up during the conference call. very clear, but the company was talking about good product, good product. >> companies don't want to acknowledge they are n
in washington? the higher payroll taxes, and the general sense that the economy's not getting any better. is it? the answer's simple. why you may not think the overall economy is getting better, you're missing the big picture, partner. if you were to ask me to game the market using just one figure, one figure only, it wouldn't be what apple earns, the gross domestic product, the growth rate of earnings or the dividend yield of the s&p, it would be the weekly jobless claims. the weekly jobless claims is an indicator of future employment in this country. there's absolutely no coincidence that we had five-year highs today in the stock market. at the same time that unemployment claims hit five-year lows. it isn't fanciful that the market's roaring because jobs are being created at an accelerating pace. it's the most important determinant of the stock market. after all, the market got crushed when unemployment went above 5.5% and soared right into the great recession. i think these positive jobless numbers are occurring because of the certainty that comes from putting a presidential election and a t
, there are a whole host of taxes across a number of sectors. there's taxes on investment income. there's taxes on devices. there's taxes on drugs, and all of that flows through ultimately to premium that employers have to pay for their employees. that's going to get reflected in the cost of their prices to consumers, so ultimately it gets right back to the consumer. >> you said on "the call" today some companies are trying to avoid health coverage by reducing employees' hours. i'm wondering if that's one of the unintended consequences of this whole thing of what we need to consider and what the broad implications might be on the overall employment picture as a result of affordable care act. >> well, i think that one of the things that we always know about regulation, that as long as we're part of a free market, which is what our country is, that people are going to find a way to fix it to work for them economically, and so one of the things that we will see in the service industries, particularly hospitality and retail, is we're going to see people shorten hours on some of their employees to b
taxes that left americans with less take home pay. the conference board saying its reading dropped to 58.6 in january. that's down from 66.7 in december and the lowest level since november of 2011, ty. >> sue, fed policy numbers kick off a two-day meeting today to discuss the economy and, of course, interest rates. where does wall street see the u.s. economy going from where we are today and what are the biggesthrea to the recovery? steve liesman fresh here with the results of the exclusive cnbc survey. take it away. >> really interesting results, tyler. i was not expecting this. one of the most important questions we ask month to month, what is the probability of recession in the next 12 months. you can see on the fiscal cliff debate shot up to 36%, came down during the winter and shot back up as we went back into the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling debate. it's come down markedly, 20.4%. that's the low as long as we've been asking this question and one of the big edrops we've seen. it comes in the next line as growth forecasts are rising. this the tail of the tape of the gdp forecast of
a more effective tax system. it reduced taxes going forward. and i think we could have had a booming environment. i may be wrong. that's my own personal belief. if we had a grand bargain, america will take off. i think it's very important for america to get strong. the rest of the world needs us to. europe still has its issues. i think it's important that america kind of took the lead here. >> what does your gut tell you about all of this money moving into stocks recently? do you think this is sustainable? >> yeah, if the economy grows, it's sustainable. you know, it's not just america, it's european, japanese and chinese companies. but you're still buying them at fairly good prices. and your alternatives aren't really that good. so, yes, i'm comfortable owning stocks right now. >> my thanks to jamie di plrksz on. >>> the state of business, the state of investors and the state of europe all part of the conversation here this week from citi ceo to a billionaire philanthropist. here's what they had to say. >> our strategy is really focused around a few of the big secular things that ar
of the certainty that comes from putting a presidential election and a tax fight behind us. plus, the warring political parties seem to have -- it does seem like a truce at hand deferring a ridiculous and harmful government shutdown. throwing a huge turn in china that converts believers every day along with stabilization of europe and multinational companies have at last powered higher. all that good news in the jobs it creates are causing a radical revision in what we're willing to pay for future earnings. that's right, the price to earnings multiple, the ratio of how much we'll pay for the profits companies are going to have down the road is headed north and therefore so are the stock prices. we're willing to pay up because of the prospect that things are, indeed better. let me show you what i mean. let's take the transports. they've been scorching, scorching despite the index being home, beating down trucking companies, worldwide freight plays, and the railroads -- which were just annihilated by an historic decline in the most important cargo, coal. what's happening now if the economy's ge
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, and now a lot of those uncertainties have been wiped away with the budget ceiling and the tax situation that i think gives us a great deal of improvement, but as dandy don used to say when he hosted "monday night live," when it became obvious, he used to sing "turn out the lights, the party is over," and i think that's what's happening now. investors are realizing that the bond market party may be over, and it's time to shift to equities. >> let me ask you again. how are you allocating capital then in. >> we like a lot of sectors in the equity market. we like energy, materials and industrials, and some of the technology names are looking really pretty right now. >> rick, it's a perfect segue to you. he said the bond market party may be over. is it? >> well, no, i absolutely do not think so. here we are still toying with 2% as we get close to record highs in the dow jones industrial average. there's an incongruent relationship there, just like there's an incongruent relationship with the fact that we're talking about the dow near records, and tomorrow morning at 8:30 eastern i'm going to
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of opportunities. but both of those are outside the u.s. so we're assuming that the tax laws are not going to change. we're basically going to put our money to work in places like canada, the uk, israel, russia and asia where they're going to get a return and where we want it. >> that is a change and that starts spreading out, does that mean the rate of pick up in dividend payments and shares -- >> no, we committed to our shareholders 50% of our cash flow we will pay back on them, either in the form of dividends or share buybacks. but i think the key things to take away from davos is we're becoming the innovative leader and many of the concepts appear to be paying out very well for us. >> so what makes more sense for you right now, dividends, increase or a buyback? >> we're going to poll our shareholders. we've committed to giving you 50% back. >> thank you for join onning the program. >> we so appreciate it. >> thank you. now, look, we were going to talk about this but while we've got maria here, derek jeter, right? >> yes. he came to see me at dinner last night. i was talking about when
out of france, because it's bankrupt, stephane? >> no. i went out of france for tax reasons. you know that. spain might be even more trying to reduce its public deficit over the next couple of years. european officials will not make a decision until next month when they will assess the spanish austerity program on the 22nd of january. it was explained that europe information would have to take into account the growth prospect of the fiscal space for each country in europe and could, indeed, soften the spanish deficit target if the economy continues to contract. that's precisely what we are expecting because for the fourth quarter, we are expecting the spanish gdp to shrink by 0.4%. for the time being, spain has a deficit target of 4.5% for 2013. that seems to be really ambitious if not out of reach. because to meet this new target, the government would need to find $20 billion of additional euro cut. that won't help the spanish economy to go out of recession. for that reason, oli rehn thinks spain will need some incentive from stimulus measure toes improve its economy and boost its la
because last quarter we have an increase on the vat taxes and really we pass from the bat from 70% four years ago to 21% now in the last quarter. really as you say, the retail -- the consumer has fallen down dramatic. we need to remember that the public employees has cut their extra payment from the christmas extra payment. and this situation with no more extra for christmas present has fallen down, too, since christmas time. >> citibank says public debt the surge from 88% to 110% of gdp in two years. surely the spanish government is going to have to go into an ecb program. not so that they can get cheap money. so they can get money flowing. >> yeah. as you say before, the situation is the new ministers that the government call reinforce our economy. really our debt limits is too high in terms of ecb, in terms of europe. okay, we're going to cut in our deficit level, but it's not enough. now the question is, if we need to rein in our growing economy and how to do it if the tax increase is enough for the consumer, it's enough for the companies in our country. really, in fact, the only wa
on rye kind of what we're seeing. here is one thing that we're watching. the payroll tax increase didn't bother us when the price of gasoline was down. but over the past few weeks, we've seen the price of gas go up by anywhere from 30 to -- 25 to 35 cents per gallon. that really puts an impact on $20 a week for 50,000 in income. that price in gasoline really was going to make double hit behind the increase in payroll taxes. >> that is an interesting point. i hadn't really thought about that. when it comes to the jobs number on friday, kevin, tell me what you think the market is looking for? what would be really good news and what would be look out? >> they want it big. the guys are going to probably pull bids out and put up some shorts going into it. i'd watch for an air pocket down. my own opinion is i think you'll see a number finally over 250. we're overdue for that number. and -- >> the dawn of february 1st? >> they don't have time to cook the books by february 1st on that, do they? huh? >> it's friday. >> they're supposed to be good at it, i don't know. >> well, they are -- >> i t
are? this does include taxes, and it is a hotel. but it doesn't include your mortgage. you're paying $95 million. and then what do you pay -- >> during the commercial break i guessed 17 grand a month. >> i would like to raise that -- >> 17 grand a month? >> to 55 grand a month. >> very close. 60,000 a month in monthly maintenance fees. now that does include twice -- it includes maid service and a spa and some other things. so you're paying $95 million and then you're paying $60,000 a month in maintenance. but we bring you through all kind of apartments tonight. $160 million worth of real estate in new york. >> are these places back? i mean for awhile things crashed and nobody could afford these places. are they really back? because we still talk about how on wall street those pay packages are coming back. >> that's what everyone was saying a year ago, two years ago. two things happened. one is foreign money. i mean one of the great things about this show tonight is we bring you through with a russian buyer as he's in central park west. the russians, the chinese, the latins, especiall
, merger which i think could happen with the fortune. and really could. it's not till november that the tax laws allow that to be. i do believe it's going to blow a quarter. i think mtw should split itself up into two separate companies. food, service, and cranes. remember those ice machines when you go out to -- ice machines, you feel like you're getting something for free. it's really water. we also get results from beemus. its tom symbol is bms, which stands for buy my stock. here's the stock i mentioned earlier this week as part of the brand new bull market in packaging of all things. you're going to sey 15id that. i'm expecting a very good quarter after the close. we get the new one, the ipo, barry plastics. the other packaging bull market player. i think there's a lot to like here too. on the lookout for both of these. if buy my stock goes down ahead of when it reports, buy its stock. all right. now, on friday morning i think you're going to see the contrast between the world's largest oil company, exxon, which has truly become a serial disappointer, and chevron, which has become a co
. the fiscal cliff was a big issue on the tax side. we've extended the debt ceiling to may. that really could be july. i don't know that they represent the risks that a lot of people thought was represented in august 2011 heading into it. we realize hindsight, yields did not spike dramatically. we didn't get a massive number of investors whether it was institutions, pension funds that were forced out of treasuries. because of that aaa rating gone. i think we learned some lessons. but i still think unfortunately washington and the ranker and the political system remains one of them. >> it sounds you're not as worried about washington. >> we're sadly becoming immune to their antics. >> we'll leave it there. good to see you. thank you so much. >>> about ten minutes to go before we close it up on monday on wall street here. dow jones industrial average still hanging in just below 13,900. >>> well, it has been the feud that continues to be the buzz on wall street. >> and in 2003 i get a call from this ackman guy. he's like the cry baby in the schoolyard. >> carl icahn does not have a good reputati
to what's already there from the tax increases we saw earlier in the month, and you put it all together and you've got 1.5% to 2% of fiscal drag instead of the usual boost so i think it will slow us pretty rapidly. you know, given that we're flat in the fourth quarter, it's not a good sign. >> when does the debt catch up to us then? i mean, do you worry about the $17 trillion debt, $16.4 trillion debt? when does that catch up? >> you know, i don't worry about it too much for two reasons. one, i tried to worry about it with japan and lost an awful lot of money betting on interest rates going up there. secondly, remember, interest rates on outstanding debt are about 80 basis point on average for the government so the debt interest rate burden is about 1.5% of gdp. that's about as low as it's ever been. we're lucky, but that's the way it is. >> lindsey, so what's the answer here? let's just assume that the -- that the sequester takes effect. >> sure. >> that you do have the pullback in spending. seems to me that would put an awful lot of pressure on the fed to try to do something even more
. they've got plenty of room to make a good margin and pay this tax to microsoft for the operating system. i'm not so concerned about apple as much as just the whole market getting commoditized. on the consumer side, i think that's a tough market for microsoft. if you don't need office, you really don't need to pay a premium for your products. they can afford to cut price on their hardware. microsoft's hair wear shipments are material on the market. they're there to show good design. it's important that their partners -- >> you could say they're out of touch. you mentioned office. i see now there's a suggestion that actually when the new office suite comes out, it will be licensed. you will pay a monthly subscription in order to have microsoft office. that doesn't seem to be where the bulk of the market is at the moment. that's not what consumers are doing, generally in their lives, is it? >> actually, simon, 20% of office's consumer, you know, 80% is enterprise, and 60% of enterprises are on subscription already. so there is a pretty significant migration to subscription that's well alon
take to take advantage of tax breaks. that will be popular and concern they have an exceptional threat to the republic of ireland if that blew up and the big day to this week is pmi's coming out of italy and spain. always forward-looking indicator where we might be going with the economy. could it be we have greater stability than we thought. that would be great. >> and we have numbers of our own. let's get a check on energy and commodities. good morning, sharon. >> good morning. we're looking at gasoline futures the leader, highs of the session up about 6 cents or so on the heels of hess announcing it is closing its refinery in new jersey. it prods 10,000 or i should say 50,000 barrels a day of gasol e gasoline, a small refinery compared to others but also key for the snoerk harbor area and why we're seeing an impact on the nymex crack. drivers are likely to see an increase and we could see 5-10% price jump in the new york area and along the east coast. we're watching what's happening with natural gas. it's fallen off a cliff due to we're looking at warmer temperatures and a two week
and will consumer be hurt by payroll tax hikes. probably the best way to think about the economy now. you get there by averaging stronger than expected growth in third quarter. what's clear, is this report, think of it as the ghost of christmas future. if you cut back an gov spending, it mathematically approaches. it sets the stage and uncertainty associated with it for better growth in the future. tyler? >> steve, much to think about there. how are defense stocks reacting to the 22% reduction in defense spending by the government in the fourth quarter? jane wells has details in l.a. jane? >> tyler, defense spending down. after reporting descent guidance and returning lots of cash to investors, saying quote i can't recall a time of greater uncertainty. raising guidance but none of the companies are factoring in possibility within extra half trillion in cuts kicking in in march. pentagon spending, as you can see, never 22%. cuts included 43% cuts to ships. 90 percent in weapons support. but look, 64% jump in missile spending. good for lockheed and raytheon. we have an attack inside syria. expe
home. looks more like a standard colonial. interestingly here, the taxes are just and for somebody in new jersey, there is a key, 4300 on that $800 thousand home. let's move to the last one stepping up above to $1.1 million. 600, 30 pj street in st. pete. >>> ty, counting down to super bowl xxxxvii. . brian? >> sue, the sun is out. league is ready. nfl is about squeezing revenue from everywhere. coming up on "power lunch." few places that they get money from you might not expect. we'll be right back. that has changed the modern world... would define you as an innovator. to hold more than one patent of this caliber... would define you as a true leader. ♪ to hold over 80,000... well, that would make you... the creators of the 2013 mercedes-benz e-class... quite possibly the most advanced luxury sedan ever. see your authorized mercedes-benz dealer for exceptional offers through mercedes-benz financial services. >>> maybe you've heard this. 49ers taking on the ravens. so much is made of the commercials during the game but is the big money really made on the field? brian is live in ne
to use their warehouses. remember when people say, once there's a sales tax, they're history. it didn't matter. >> california, i guess we were wrong, yeah. ease of use. >> it said the 3-d players weren't that strong, tvs weren't that strong. maybe they're buying them at best buy. >> big pause. >> maybe. listen, best buy has been an interesting move up here. by the way, period is going to begin very soon. richard schulze has his opportunity to do due diligence. now, i think the dell -- potential dell ibo got people excited about maybe they could get the equity. i hear it's going to be a very, very, very -- is that three verys? they'll come up with the money they need, even with him rolling in his stake. this may be the fourth quarter numbers, people perceive as being better than anticipated. >> if they're giving money away to netflix, can't they give money away to michael dell? isn't there just this weird supply of money out there? >> there's a lot of money, but it's still seeking a return. >> sometimes. >> yeah, sometimes. >> let's check in with bob who's here on the floor with more o
, you know, from a corporate perspective, we'd love to see something done on the corporate tax rate here in the u.s. love to keep more jobs here. just got to find a way to solve that problem. >> how does obama care and the health reform affect you as a company? >> well, certainly it provides re people will be covered by prescriptions. that's great news for the entire pharmaceutical space. for our particular company, we don't focus so much on continuous care medicines. we generally focus on women's health, those kind of issues so for us not as great but for other pharmaceutical companies great opportunity. >> we'll let you go. they will be anxious to get you up to the balcony so you can ring the closing bell. your logo is green. why didn't you wear green? >> i wore green for him. >> you're australian? >> yeah, i'm starting to forget it. >> no idea. >> we're about to enjoy the close with 20 minute to go here, and the market is continuing to levitate a bit. >> absolutely. still marching closer and closer to a all-time high. really driving this rally? is it fundamentals or just the fed's eas
, and then there's also a new tax change that's being put in place in roughly 2014. so there's some additional spending taking place there. but i think that the rebuilding that's taking place today as you comment is very different from what took place after the kobe earthquake. >> i've got to tell you, dan, this is the best i've seen your company. you've got the real estate trust structure. thank you so much. it's perfect. great to see you, sir. >> great to talk to you, jim. thanks. >> my charitable trust sold it. after listening to what i just heard, we shouldn't have sold. this is just a really good stock. wy is really, really right. dan fulton's got it together. stay with wy. stay with cramer. >> coming up, clash of the titans. missed the sparks fly on cnbc today? >> carl, you want to bid for the company, go ahead and bid for the company. >> you don't have to tell me what i'm free to do. >> two big money managers are clashing over herbalife. cramer's translating all the lingo to let you know what it all means for this embattled stock going forward. >>> all right. you may have seen one of th
's no longer, it's as bad as it used to be. they didn't mind paying the taxes. they are buying back stock. what a good call. >> all true. it's an interesting point you make, one that we perhaps don't focus enough on, in creating enthusiasm amongst your own employee base in order to attract talent, in order to keep talent. she seems to be having success at doing that. >> she has charisma. >> it is about free cafeteria food and issuing iphones to employees. >> it's important when it's a turn-around story and there has to be one or two more quarters for the results to be seen. that's a great point you made, because these are needed expectations, the fact that they beat, and they show the business lines weren't doing much worse. but revenues were better than consensus. it was a stability quarter. they bought back a lot of stock, because it's extremely investment friendly. >> a number of directors on the board will be focused on that. dan loeb is still in there. probably will be for some time. and has done very well with it. that helps also. he was key in terms of at least the appointment of mayer t
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